Skip to main content

Eight Do's and One Don't About Report Cards...not in any particular order


(1) Don't wait until the last minute to write them.  I always think I can do report cards in 7 - 10 days; that just doesn't work.  I need to give myself at least 3 weeks because there is always some other end-of-year task that needs to get done immediately after report cards are due, and because writing report cards isn't just about assigning marks or writing comments.  There is a lot more prep work that needs to be done before getting to that point.


(2) Do take about a week  to 10 days to gather evidence.  Read over notes from one-on-one conferences, review student work, anecdotes, and recordings of conversations, etc.  Then, jot down what I notice in terms of trends, work habits, use of strategies, and other important observations that I can use to write comments.


(3) Do try to start each comment with something positive that a child has done or said.  I have a colleague who will often quote children in her report card comments to support her own assessment of a child's academic and/or social progress.


(4) Do enjoy the process of revisiting my students' work for the term.  I found myself lingering over certain pieces of work and picturing my students doing that work in class.  In some cases, I was able to visualize students as they engaged in a particular project; this allowed me to remember things that I had forgotten.


(5) Do make a point of taking the time to stand back and observe children at work throughout the year.  And, make sure I have a clipboard or a notebook to jot down what I see.  This will help me back up my comments with concrete examples.


(6) Although I don't do this in order to aid in report card writing, do ask children to write or say one thing that they have learned at the end of each unit of study with this purpose in mind.  This will help when writing comments and can provide insights into a child's metacognitive awareness.  I can also see this spurring further conversation if a child's comments surprise or perplex me.


(7) Whenever possible, do ask a colleague to read my comments.  Sometimes I sense I've said something that doesn't sound right but I'm stumped as to how to rephrase it in a manner that parents can hear and understand.


(8) Do use allotted release time during the day to work on report cards.  I have usually not taken advantage of this time to do report cards.  I always think that I'll have more time at home and so I put it off.  But, the reality is that I don't have another 8 hours when I get home to do school work.  What I'm really doing is procrastinating by not effectively using the time I do have during the day.  This marking period, I did use time during the school day and I learned, again, that I can get a lot done in 30 minutes if I focus my attention on what needs to be done.


(9) Do maintain my regular exercise schedule and fulfill family commitments during report card writing.  I'll need the breaks and it will keep family life a little less crazy during an otherwise intense period of work.


(10) Don't wait until the last minute to write report cards.  This bears repeating because it's the one thing I seem to forget from marking period to marking period.  Once I finish all the comments and determine the marks for each area of the report card, I need to transfer this information to our online reporting system.  This doesn't seem like it would take a whole lot of time but it does!  When I give myself enough time to do all of this, I don't get sick and grumpy like everyone else around me.


What about you?  What new insights did you gain from doing your report cards this year?


Cross posted on Two Writing Teachers SOL
1 comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Teacher I Want to Be

The
I have been dismayed to realize that despite my self-image as a teacher with a learner centered classroom, I am far from truly achieving that goal. 

I have been listening carefully to myself lately, and I don't like what I hear myself saying to the kids. Instead of empowering my students to take ownership of their learning, I am still the director on the stage. I still ask leading questions rather than ones that push the learner to figure things out for herself. I realize I often spoon feed my students hopeful that they will give me the answer I'm looking for. An answer that will make my job easier. Answers that will fit with what I expect students to say despite the fact that 30 years in education has taught me nothing if not that students are unpredictable, and if we prepare for anything, that is what we should be prepared for. 
Teacher
An anecdote. The other day I was talking with a student about the fact that she was abandoning more books than she was finishing. I was as…

Searching for Balance

I have been doing a lot of soul searching over the last couple of days. 
And, I've come to the conclusion that I must change my attitude - shift my stance - so I can assume a new perspective. So that I am more aligned with what's important and may add value to my life.  
Focusing on the negative is not making me stronger or healthier. In fact, I am often stressed because I worry a lot about unimportant things. I obsess over situations out of my control. I dismiss positive experiences that would help lift my spirits and align my focus towards what's important. 
I need a distraction from my own thoughts.
I need balance in my life. Not because I work hard to prepare my classes. Not because I read a lot of professional literature. Not because I wrote a lot this summer and will continue to do so now that school has started. But because I have been obsessing on the wrong things. Mostly, I obsess about what someone said or did and what it says about me as a teacher. I obsess about …

Sitting in My Usual Spot

I am sitting in my usual spot.
At least it has been my usual spot for about a week now.
It has become my work space.
It's where I sit to participate in online summer PD activities.
It's where I read.
It's where I write.

My usual spot is in a corner of the couch.
The arm rest is unusually wide.
I can pile my books, notebooks and even my laptop there.
And, I do.

I used to have a more conventional work space,
but then my husband, who works from home,
and was struggling to stick to his side of the desk,
finally spread out,
invading my work space.

One day, after many attempts at getting organized,
and not succeeding,
he told me that he was going to add an extension to our house,
so I could have my own work space.
I told him it was cheaper to tidy up.
That was months ago.

Before claiming my usual spot,
I set up a temporary, wobbly table against a wall in my bedroom
for a work space.
I used that for a few months.
Not ideal, but better than nothing.

I've reclaimed my conventio…