Skip to main content

New Year's Resolutions Redux

I know.  I know.  A lot of bloggers have been writing about their New Year's Resolutions.  Some even did it right before the new year and some right on the first of January.  This post might be a bit late in the stream.  A Johnny come lately, of sorts.

Nevertheless, by posting my resolutions and making them public, I intend to be accountable to myself. So, I am doing this for me.  By going public, I am making a commitment to myself to carry them through.

It always amazes me how easy it is to commit to something in the relative calm of a break from school.  Once I'm back in the classroom I start to fall behind.  But, I don't want to use the excuse of being too busy as a reason for not following through on my resolve.

I want to build stamina so I know each resolution listed below won't become a habit right away.  I will try not to beat myself over the head if I do fall behind, which is inevitable.  I will pick myself up and recommit to what I want to accomplish this year.

Elisa's New Year's Resolutions, not in order of priority:

#1 - Write every day.
#2 - Read and comment on a research article related to my doctoral study, every day.
#3 - Read 100 professional books and/or novels during the year.  (This is through GoodReads.)
#4 - Be an advocate for myself.  Decide what I want and go after it!
#5 - Get on an exercise schedule 2x/week.
#6 - Watch what I eat, including portions.
#7 - Post weekly on my blog(s).
#8 - Practice mindfulness in everything I do.

Not earth shattering.  In fact, some have been on my New Year's resolutions list every year.  Sometimes I've made headway and sometimes I just lose the list, literally and figuratively, after the first couple of weeks in January.  I'm determined to do better this time around.  I'll report out about how I'm doing as the year goes on to motivate myself and to keep me honest.

Feel free to comment about your own resolutions and don't hesitate to give me feedback on mine!

Here's wishing everyone a wonderful year!

Posted to Two Writing Teachers Slice of LIfe
7 comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Reading Strategies Book - Chapter 12, Supporting Students’ Conversations – Speaking, Listening, and Deepening Comprehension

The strategy lessons highlighted in Chapter 12, Supporting Students’ Conversations – Speaking, Listening, and Deepening Comprehension, in The Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo are critical to students’ engagement and comprehension, as well as their ability to write literary essays, or even book reviews, summaries and reflective pieces about books. If students aren’t able to talk about books in a way that is invigorating and joyful, they will be less likely to develop an interest in growing ideas for writing about books.
In her introduction to this chapter, Jennifer Serravallo, reminds us that when conversations go well, children are inspired by what they read and are motivated to keep reading. However, when conversations fall flat, then kids get bored and tune out. How do we avoid this situation and teach kids to have focused conversations about books? The answer is easy: teach kids strategies to help them develop effective conversational skills. 

As in other blog posts a…

Saying Goodbye

I can't get used to saying goodbye to my daughters even though we've been doing it for the past 10 years. You'd think it gets easier, but it doesn't. It still feels like the first time.

Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Life's longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, And though they are with you yet they belong not to you.*
At the airport, I watch families with their young children and try to remember what it was like when my girls were little. What I felt like. What I was doing at the time. What we weren't doing. Was I even aware of the passage of time?

When my kids were little I lived so much in the moment that there was no time to reflect on the fact that our time as a family was measured. Sooner than we were ready, we would have to let them go. Send them on their way. Wish them an abundance of everything, but especially of love, health and joy. 

They come through you, but not from you.* 
I nod and smile, a li…

Partner Reading and Content, Too Routine (PRC2)

I'm a hoarder.
There, I've said it.
I try to deny that I'm a hoarder but it comes back to haunt me every time I move houses, or pack up my classroom at the end of the school year.
I have old articles, lesson plans, handouts, folders brimming with teaching ideas, past issues of profesional journals. I hardly throw anything out though I've learned to be more selective over the years. My one rule of thumb, and I really try to stick to this, is that if I haven't used or referred to something in a year, then it's time to toss it into the recycle bin. One exception to this rule (you knew this was coming, didn't you?) is past issues of journals from professional organizations. However, with the ability to locate articles online through my professional memberships, even this exception is becoming less and less useful, which brings me to the topic of this blog post.
I am currently reading a copy of The Reading Teacher from 2010. I've clipped a couple of informat…