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Haikus

After blogging for 30 days and continuing this habit in April, I took this weekend off to see what it feels like. I think I like the idea of not posting on Fridays and Saturdays. It seems like these are good days to do something else. But, it's Sunday and so I'm back.

In honor of Poetry Month, I decided to write a couple of haikus. Even though haikus are traditionally about nature, mine are about mundane, everyday topics. Maybe it will inspire you to write some poetry.

Note: This site explains that there is variability in the number of syllables used in a haiku written in English as opposed to the original Japanese haikus. I chose to write my haikus using the traditional three line 5-7-5 syllable configuration.



Haiku #1
The hot sun beating
on my red face makes me sweat.
It's time to go home.


Haiku #2
Our dogs run freely
across the wide and green field.
Out of breath, they rest.


Haiku #3
The soccer game starts.
The home team controls the ball. 
Quickly they lose it. 





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Is it too late?

She tries to stare me down.
Get my attention.
Let me know that she is there.
I never look,
though I am tempted.
I watch the video and
keep my gaze steady
the whole time.

In the hallways, she smiles now.
A mocking smile.
A smile that says, "I'll get you."
"You think you've won,
but this isn't over yet."

She walks around the school,
with her entourage,
and stealthily commands
their attention.

How does an early adolescent
amass so much power and
lead the rest astray?

Someone said that a person's
behaviour is set by age 8.
Is this why no one attempts to reach her?
Everyone has given up?
Settled in?
Found a comfortable spot from which to view
her world?

But, I refuse to accept that there's nothing
that can be done.
Is it too late?

It's never too late.

Cross posted to Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life.